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Canada Senate Approves Doctor-Assisted Dying Bill

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The Canadian Senate has approved, by a vote of  64-12, a bill to legalize doctor-assisted dying in the nation. The bill will be sent back to the House of Commons for a vote. The legislation is significantly different from the version the House originally sent to the Senate. It contains a total of seven amendments.

It is very unusual for the Senate to modify a law to this extent. A major point of contention within the bill has been the restriction of physician-assisted death to people whose natural death is “reasonably foreseeable.” Certain members of the government have stated that restricting this service to the terminally ill is non-negotiable, while others wish to extend it to the chronically, but not necessarily terminally, ill whose diseases are incurable and causing them unbearable suffering. The amended version of the bill does not include the element restricting doctor-assisted dying to patients who are “near death.” There are serious doubts about whether it will pass without this component.

“The bill aims to recognize the significant and continuing public health issue of suicide, which affects individuals, families and communities, to guard against death being seen as a solution to all forms of suffering, and to counter negative perceptions about the quality of life of persons who are elderly, ill or disabled,” Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould wrote.

“The government’s position is that the restriction of medical assistance in dying furthers these important objectives and does not infringe s.7 of the Charter,” which protects the right to life, liberty and security of the person.

However, Senator Peter Harder, the government’s new representative in the upper chamber, surprised many when he stood and announced he would support the amended bill.

“I will vote for the bill as presented tonight to ensure that engagement with the other chamber takes place appropriately, respectfully and that we re-engage at some point with equal respect and equal sense of obligation to serve Canadians,” said Harder.

“I hope that our amendments will be considered in the spirit and with the purpose that they were made; first to ensure the bill meets the threshold of constitutionality established by the Supreme Court of Canada,” he said before the free vote.

“But as importantly, to ensure that Bill C-14 addresses the needs and concerns of the many, many Canadians who are looking to all of us in Canada’s Parliament to provide a pathway out of unspeakable suffering they’ve been forced to ensure and hopefully to find the peace they seek.”

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New Jersey Man Latest American Tourist to Die at Dominican Republic Resort

Joseph Allen is at least the ninth American to have died while staying at resorts in the the small Caribbean country.

An Avenel, New Jersey, man died last week while staying at a resort in the Dominican Republic, becoming at least the ninth other American tourist to die under mysterious circumstances while visiting the small Caribbean country…

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Joseph Allen is at least the ninth American to have died while staying at resorts in the the small Caribbean country.

An Avenel, New Jersey, man died last week while staying at a resort in the Dominican Republic, becoming at least the ninth other American tourist to die under mysterious circumstances while visiting the small Caribbean country.

Joseph Allen, 55, was found dead in his room Thursday at the Terra Linda Resort in Sosua, where he was celebrating a friend’s birthday, his family confirmed to NBC News. Allen’s sister-in-law said that the family was scrambling for answers.

New Jersey Man Latest American Tourist to Die at Dominican Republic Resort

Joseph Allen of Avenel, New Jersey, died last week while staying at a resort in the Dominica Republic, his family confirmed to NBC News Wednesday.

A number of other families reported stories of their relatives mysteriously dying while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic.

Leyla Cox, 53, an MRI technician from Staten Island, was staying at the Excellence resort in Punta Cana when she died on June 11, just a day after her birthday, according to her son. Will Cox said he still does not know his mother’s cause of death and has not had the chance to mourn properly as her remains still haven’t been returned home.

He also told NBC News that a representative for the U.S. Embassy said a toxicology test would not be conducted on his mother’s body due to broken machines.

Robert Bell Wallace, 67, died while staying at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Punta Cana on April 12. Wallace’s family asked for privacy and has not confirmed the circumstances of his death to NBC News.

In May, Miranda Schaup-Werner and a couple, Nathaniel Edward Holmes and Cynthia Ann Day, died over a five-day period at the Bahia Principe resort in La Romana.

Holmes and Day were found dead in their room at the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana. Pulmonary edema — excess fluid in the lungs — was listed among the causes of death for the couple in preliminary reports.

The FBI, which is investigating the three May deaths, said further toxicology results on the Americans could take up to 30 days.

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ICE to Remove ‘Millions of illegal Aliens’ in US, Trump says, Scant on Details

President Donald Trump late Monday announced on Twitter that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement ICE will begin the process of “removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the U.S.,” but did not elaborate on what new measures will be taken…

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ICE to Remove ‘Millions of illegal Aliens’ in US, Trump says, Scant on Details

President Donald Trump late Monday announced on Twitter that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement ICE will begin the process of “removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the U.S.,” but did not elaborate on what new measures will be taken.

“They will be removed as fast as they come,” Trump said.

Mike Morgan, the director of the agency, did not announce any new initiatives during his stop in Louisville on Sunday, where he spoke about the humanitarian and national security crisis at the border.

ICE did not immediately respond to an email from Fox News for comment.

Earlier this month, Trump announced that the U.S. reached a deal with Mexico that includes plans to return migrants seeking asylum to Mexico, where they will remain until they can be processed.

Trump praised Mexico in the tweet, saying the country has been doing a very good job at stopping those trying to gain access to the U.S. border.

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US to Send 1,000 Additional Troops to the Middle East as Tensions Escalate with Iran

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan announced Monday that President Donald Trump’s administration will send a thousand troops to the Middle East amid increased tensions with Iran…

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US to Send 1,000 Additional Troops to the Middle East as Tensions Escalate with Iran

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan announced Monday that President Donald Trump’s administration will send a thousand troops to the Middle East amid increased tensions with Iran.

Shanahan said that the increased forces were in response to a request from U.S. Central Command for defensive purposes to address air, naval and ground-based threats in the Middle East. U.S authorities accused Iran of attacks on two tankers last week, though the country’s foreign minister has denied the accusations.

“The recent Iranian attacks validate the reliable, credible intelligence we have received on hostile behavior by Iranian forces and their proxy groups that threaten United States personnel and interests across the region,” Shanahan said. “The U.S. does not seek conflict with Iran.”

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan, center, speaks about the situation in the Persian Gulf region during a meeting with Portuguese Minister of National Defense Joao Cravinho, at the Pentagon on June 14, 2019.

The decision comes hours after the State Department said Secretary of State Mike Pompeo planned to meet with U.S. military commanders overseeing American forces to provide more proof that Iran was behind the tanker attacks.

U.S. Central Command said the two vessels were hit Thursday by a limpet mine, which is attached to boats below the waterline using magnets.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif angrily dismissed the claims and said they were without “a shred of factual or circumstantial evidence.”

The Japanese owner of one of the tankers attacked in the Gulf of Oman contradicted reports by U.S. officials and the military on the source of the blast, claiming it was struck by a flying projectile.

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said in an interview with pan-Arabic newspaper Asharq al-Awsat last week that he would not hesitate to confront regional threats.

“The kingdom does not want war in the region, but we will not hesitate to deal with any threat to our people, our sovereignty and our vital interests,” Salman said.

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