Man Stabs Himself to Death in Target Store Kitchen Aisle

Man Stabs Himself to Death in Target Store Kitchen Aisle

A man committed suicide Wednesday morning at a Target in Fontana, California, apparently with a self-inflicted knife wound to his torso, according to the Fontana Police Department.


Surveillance video shows the man walking into the Target in the 15200 block of Summit Avenue, at the Falcon Ridge Town Center shopping mall, shortly after 11 a.m. and removing “a knife out of a package before using it to stab himself,” police said in a statement.

Officers responded to the location and found the fatally wounded individual in the housewares section, the news release stated.

The man died at the scene, the Los Angeles News Group reported, citing police. He was not immediately identified, pending notification of next of kin.

The section of the Target where the incident happened was “secured and covered,” obscuring it from public view,  police spokeswoman Martha Guzman-Hurtado said, adding that the store initially remained open for business.

“It’s disgusting that they would let people continue to shop when there’s a dead body inside,” Marlene Rodriguez, 34, told the Los Angeles News Group.

Reached by phone at 3 p.m., a Target spokeswoman said the store was closed but declined to say when the closure occurred.

“At Target, the safety and security of our team members and guests is our top priority,” said Erika Winkels, a public relations manager for the company. The retailer was cooperating with law-enforcement officials as they conducted an investigation, she said.

About Alexis Sostre

Entrepreneur, contributor, writer, and editor of Sostre News. With a powerful new bi-lingual speaking generation by his side, Sostre News is becoming the preferred site for the latest in Politics, Entertainment, Sports, Culture, Tech, Breaking and World News.

Check Also

Powerball: Somebody’s Gotta Win, Eventually

Powerball: Somebody’s Gotta Win, Eventually

The big idea: Some wonder why anyone would buy a lottery ticket. Others think: Why not spend two bucks each week for a chance to become a millionaire — or better? Behavioral economists shed light on why what seems the height of illogic to some makes perfect sense to others...