Orange Park, Florida: Man Dies of Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound After Opening Fire at Local Business

Orange Park, Florida: Man Dies of Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound After Opening Fire at Local Business

CLAY COUNTY, Fla. — Deputies said a man was injured when an employee opened fire on his coworkers at an Orange Park business Monday before he took his own life.

The Clay County Sheriff’s Office said James Cameau continued to shoot at his coworkers as they ran from the gunfire at Jacksonville Granite.

Deputies said Cameau appeared ‘despondent’ in the days before he left work and returned with a handgun.

Deputies said it around noon when Cameau came around the back of the building where employees were working and began shooting at point blank range.

Deputies said two people were in close range of Cameau but his gun jammed and they fled.

Deputies said he followed employees through the center of the business and continued shooting at them as they ran away.

Cameau also shot at the owner of the business. His car was hit several times, according to deputies.

It took units 5-6 minutes to get to the business after reports of the shooting.

Cameau barricaded himself in a closet where security equipment was stored.

Units arrived, went into active shooter protocol and found Cameau dead from a self-inflicted bullet wound.

Dean Hagins Jr. was shot by Cameau but is expected to be OK, according to CCSO.

Deputies said Cameau began working at the business about a month ago. They do not yet know why he began shooting.

Cameau was previously charged with DUI and driving with a suspended license.


Deputies are continuing to investigate in the area of the 100 block of Industrial Loop is south of Wells Road. The Orange Park Police Department assisted during the incident.

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