Recent Rainfall Causes Rare ‘Super Bloom’ of Wildflowers at Death Valley National Park

Recent Rainfall Causes Rare ‘Super Bloom’ of Wildflowers at Death Valley National Park

The growth of millions of dormant wildflower seeds in the valley was triggered by three rainstorms in October, which left behind at least 3 inches of rain. The last ‘super bloom’ occurred in 2005.


One of the hottest and driest places on Earth is now, for a short while, covered in beautiful yellow, pink and purple wildflowers

Death Valley has wildflower blooms every year, but an unusual series of storms in October has triggered what some call a “super bloom,” seen in these photos. This is the biggest bloom Death Valley has seen in a decade.

The flowers that bloom lie dormant as seeds in the valley for most of the year. Varieties now blooming include the Desert Gold, the Golden Evening Primrose and the more elusive Desert Five-spot.

Previous super blooms were in 1998 and 2005. Those years, like 2015 and 2016, also saw heavy El Niño activity.

The seeds for the Death Valley wildflowers lie dormant for most of the year. The blooms are short-lived, and so-called super blooms like this are rare.

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