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Senator Elizabeth Warren Highlights that Trump is a “Racist Bully” and that a Vote for Jill Stein Would Only Help Trump

Senator Elizabeth Warren recently, and I must say, very appropriately, called Donald Trump a “racist bully.” She said also that a vote for the Green Party’s presidential nominee, Jill Stein, is essentially a vote for Donald Trump…

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Senator Elizabeth Warren Highlights that Trump is a "Racist Bully" and that a Vote for Jill Stein Would Only Help Trump

Senator Elizabeth Warren recently, and I must say, very appropriately, called Donald Trump a “racist bully.” She said also that a vote for the Green Party’s presidential nominee, Jill Stein, is essentially a vote for Donald Trump.

Adding to her speech at Roxbury Community College, the senator said,  Trump has constantly proven to be a “thin-skinned, racist bully.” She then said his approach is hateful, with parts of his campaign being based on hate and that it is not characteristic of our country: that our country “is better than that.”

Warren then took the stance that, no, voters should not vote for Dr. Jill Stein over Secretary and Democratic Presidential Nominee, Hillary Clinton. Her reasons are simple. Anything can be precocious in getting Trump even inches closer to the White House, as she said in essence. Warren then suggested directly that a vote for Stein is a vote that brings Mr. Trump closer to the White House.

Also today, Dr. Stein even voiced more apprehensions and warning about Donald Trump. She did so by calling him a neo-fascist, basically. She generally suggested in her interview with Democracy Now, that Trump resonates fascist qualities of leaders of the past. This makes it clear that a vote for Trump is a vote for misfortune and peril in the United States.

Recently, on “Hannity” on Fox News, Trump generalized minorities once again, fabricating a vibe that illegal immigrants have been acutely responsible for deaths and fatalities in the country. One woman came forward, saying this is not an isolated issue. Trump, once again, has me disappointed in him and terrified if he gets elected.

Hi, I am Umar Siddiqui. I am currently a student at the University of California, Riverside majoring in Media and Cultural Studies. My areas of interest in studies are mainly communications, journalism, media, and cultural/ social issues. My hobbies are anything Disney, music, creative writing, fashion, friends, social activism, etc. I am a very sociable person who is outgoing and opinionated; making my opinions known is important to me. I recently completed a fashion journalism short course online at the University of the Arts London's London College of Fashion. I am anticipating to graduate with my Bachelor's of Arts degree spring of 2017.

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‘Very Substantial Evidence’ Trump is ‘Guilty of High Crimes and Misdemeanors,’ Jerry Nadler says

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'Very Substantial Evidence' Trump is 'Guilty of High Crimes and Misdemeanors,' Jerry Nadler says

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler on Sunday said Robert Mueller’s report presents “very substantial evidence” that President Donald Trump is “guilty of high crimes and misdemeanors” — an impeachable offense.

“We have to … let Mueller present those facts to the American people, and then see where we go from there, because the administration must be held accountable,” Nadler, whose committee would lead impeachment proceedings, said on “Fox News Sunday.”

Mueller, the former special counsel for the Department of Justice and former director of the FBI, will testify before Congress on July 24 after House Democrats issued a subpoena for his appearance. Earlier this year, Mueller concluded a nearly two-year-long investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Democrats are deeply divided on whether to pursue an impeachment inquiry, and Mueller’s public testimony may provide an opportunity for the party to unify and decide whether impeachment proceedings should go forward or not. More than 80 House Democrats have called for starting an impeachment inquiry into the President — the first step in a lengthy process, but House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Nadler have so far resisted the pressure to open an inquiry. Behind the scenes, Nadler has lobbied Pelosi to open an inquiry.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff said Sunday most Americans haven’t read the dense 448-page Mueller report.

Schiff said on CBS “Face The Nation” that the report contains “a pretty damning set of facts,” and said, “Who better to bring them to life than the man who did the investigation himself.”
“We want the people to hear it directly from him,” Schiff said.

Mueller said in a rare and remarkable public statement in May his investigation could not clear Trump of obstruction of justice, and that charging the President was not an option his office could consider.

“If we had had confidence that the President clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so,” Mueller said. “We did not, however, make a determination as to whether the President did commit a crime.”

The former special counsel’s probe, which also investigated possible collusion, found that members of the Trump campaign knew they would benefit from Russia’s illegal actions to influence the election, but did not take criminal steps to help.

Mueller delivered a road map of how the investigation played out and the possible role that Congress could play in holding Trump accountable. He highlighted how the “Constitution requires a process other than” the criminal justice system to hold officeholders accountable, a clear signal his obstruction investigation into Trump could be carried on by Congress.

The impeachment clause in Article II of the US Constitution outlines the process of removing a president, which begins with a vote in the House of Representatives. Offenses that could prompt impeachment are treason, bribery or other “high crimes and misdemeanors.”

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Julián Castro Calls on Puerto Rico Governor to Resign

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Julián Castro Calls on Puerto Rico Governor to Resign

Democratic presidential contender Julián Castro called on embattled Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló (D) to resign, saying “it’s clear” that the leader of the U.S. territory “can no longer be effective.”

Rosselló has resisted calls to resign as he struggles to cope with a corruption scandal involving former members of his administration and the release of hundreds of pages of messages between him and his top lieutenants that contained homophobic and misogynistic slurs.

“I stand with Puerto Ricans who are protesting in the streets his administration. We’ve seen comments that he and others in the administration have made, we’ve seen the use of force against the people of Puerto Rico,” Castro told reporters at a campaign stop in Manchester, N.H.

“This governor can no longer be effective and I believe he should resign,” added the former Housing and Urban Development secretary.

Two former members of Rosselló’s administration were arrested by the FBI earlier this month, accused of directing more than $15 million in government contracts to favored businesses.

Meanwhile, the Puerto Rican Center for Investigative Journalism released a trove of messages exchanged among Rosselló and his closest allies, including at least two Cabinet members, where homophobic and misogynistic slurs were directed at journalists and political rivals.

Rosselló has since apologized repeatedly for his role in the texting scandal. But protests demanding his resignation have rocked San Juan through the week.

An array of public officials, as well as several prominent Puerto Rican public figures, have also demanded Rosselló’s resignation.

And Rosselló, who is up for reelection in 2020, has lost much support within his own local party, the New Progressive Party (PNP).

“Reelection is out of the question, out of the question. The party has been clear and has expressed it in an elegant but concise manner,” Puerto Rico Senate Majority Leader Carmelo Ríos told The Hill Thursday.

President Trump on Thursday denounced Puerto Rico’s leaders as “corrupt” amid the massive protests demanding his resignation.

Puerto Rico’s government has been widely criticized for its response to Maria, which left thousands dead and devastated much of the island in 2017. But the Trump administration has also been the target of criticism for its disaster-relief efforts.

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Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello Says He’s Not Resigning After Private Chat Scandal

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Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello Says He's Not Resigning After Private Chat Scandal

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló said Monday that he has no plans to resign or give up his leadership of the pro-statehood New Progressive Party after a fierce public outcry over the release of profanity-laced and derogatory private chat messages with other officials and close associates.

Rosselló did say in a radio interview, however, that as a “tactical measure” he would think about whether he should seek re-election next year.

The messages, which included homophobic and misogynistic comments, have been strongly condemned by other officials in his party and drawn protests outside the governor’s mansion in Old San Juan. Some excerpts of the chats, on the instant messaging service Telegram, were leaked to local media on July 8th. The island’s Center for Investigative Journalism, which received the 889 pages from a source, published them in their entirety on Saturday.

In the chats, the group used disparaging and sexist terms to refer to San Juan’s mayor, Carmen Yulín Cruz, as well as former New York City Council President Melissa Mark-Viverito. They also belittled the death of independence movement leader Carlos Gallisá and slammed the federal control board overseeing the island’s finances.

READ MORE: Top Puerto Rican Officials Resign Amid Group Chat Scandal

The group used a homophobic comment in relation to international pop star Ricky Martin, who is from Puerto Rico. On Twitter, Martin urged Rosselló to step down.

The governor, Martin tweeted, “lacks the abilities of a true leader, who inspires, stimulates and guides by example so that our people attain a higher level of life.”

Over the weekend, a group of mayors and officials from the governor’s New Progressive Party, including the president of Puerto Rico’s House of Representatives, Carlos “Johnny” Mendez, had urged Rosselló to “re-evaluate” and reflect on his position. In a statement, they wrote that “the most recent publications of the content in the Telegram chat do not reflect in any way how our delegation or the party feels.”

On Saturday, Rosselló announced that other top officials who participated in the chats had submitted their resignations. This included the secretary of state, Luis G. Rivera Marín, who would have been next in line for the governorship if Rosselló were no longer in his position.

The commonwealth’s chief financial officer, Christian Sobrino, who is also the governor’s representative to the federal control board overseeing Puerto Rico’s finances, also announced he was stepping down. The federal control board was a topic in the chats.

The island’s justice secretary, Wanda Vázquez, announced that she was appointing a special task force to determine whether the comments in the chats broke any laws. On Monday, Rosselló said he had reviewed the chats and he said he had committed no wrongdoing.

The messaging scandal comes on the heels of the arrests of the island’s former secretary of education, Julia Keleher, and five other people on charges of steering federal money to unqualified, politically connected contractors.

It also occurs against the backdrop of the U.S. commonwealth’s ongoing attempts to recover after the devastation of Hurricane Maria in 2017 as well as Puerto Rico’s ongoing financial crisis.

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