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Trump To Meet Israeli Prime Minister: Will There Be Peace in the Middle East?

There are a plethora of issues currently overbearing the Middle East. Those include the Syrian conflict, Iranian nuclear deal, Israeli settlements in the West Banks, etc.

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Trump To Meet Israeli Prime Minister: Will There Be Peace in the Middle East?

There are a plethora of issues currently overbearing the Middle East. Those include the Syrian conflict, Iranian nuclear deal, Israeli settlements in the West Banks, etc.

The meeting is crucial to repairing the relationship between the United States and Israel as the Obama administration had stopped Israeli settlement construction, creating weary relations.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Obama never saw eye-to-eye.(JASON REED/REUTERS)

“Politically, it’s extremely important for both Netanyahu and Trump to signal the fact that this represents a significant departure from the dysfunction of the U.S.-Israel relationship, at least as it’s perceived, over the course of the last eight years,” said Aaron David Miller, vice president for new initiatives at the Woodrow Wilson Center, who advised both Republican and Democratic secretaries of state on the Arab-Israeli peace process.

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu will expect negotiations on the terms of dissuading Iranians regional behavior, according to Dennis Ross, who worked on the Middle East peace process under Presidents Obama, Clinton and George H.W. Bush.

“That is a profound concern to the Israelis because, by year 15, Iran will be a nuclear threshold state, in a position where it could move very quickly to turn that threshold status into a weapons status,” Ross said. “I think that what the prime minister would like to see, and at least probe the possibility of, is seeing whether the administration is willing with the other members of the P5+1 to revisit at least the timetables that are built into this agreement.”

Discussion in the meeting will touch on Netanyahu’s government planning to expand with more than 5,000 new homes and a plan to construct an entirely new settlement, reported by CBS News.

Officially, though, the administration “has not taken an official position on settlement activity,” says press secretary Sean Spicer.

On the other hand, Palestinians fear Trump will neglect support for an independent Palestinian state.

A senior White House official said Tuesday that peace between Israeli and Palestinians did not necessarily have to mean Palestinian statehood, adding that Trump may not “dictate” a solution, according to Reuters. The United States has long supported the idea of creating a Palestine alongside Israel.

Trump supports the goal of peace between Israel and the Palestinians, even if it does not involve the two-state solution, a senior White House official said on Tuesday.

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Trump Holds ‘MAGA’ Rally in Orlando to Kick off 2020 Re-Election Campaign

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Trump Holds 'MAGA' Rally in Orlando to Kick off 2020 Re-Election Campaign

Vice President Mike Pence introduces President Trump in Orlando, Florida where the Trump 2020 re-election campaign will officially begin with one of the president’s signature ‘MAGA‘ rallies. Trump rolls out his re-election bid just as tensions heat up in Congress over growing calls for his impeachment.

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Trump Campaign Fires Pollsters after Leaked Numbers Show Him Trailing Biden

Donald Trump’s reelection campaign is in rough shape for a sitting president, according to its own internal polling. A 17-state poll conducted in March showed the president trailing former vice president and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden in 11 states.

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Trump campaign fires pollsters after leaked numbers show him trailing Biden

Donald Trump’s reelection campaign is in rough shape for a sitting president, according to its own internal polling. A 17-state poll conducted in March showed the president trailing former vice president and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden in 11 states.

ABC News obtained some of the actual data that showed “a double-digit lead for Biden in Pennsylvania 55-39 and Wisconsin 51-41 and had Biden leading by seven points in Florida. In Texas, a Republican stronghold, the numbers showed the president only leading by two points.”

The Trump campaign responded with an odd mash-up of denials. Trump told his aides to claim that the polls, which were conducted in late March, didn’t actually exist. When Trump’s 2020 campaign manager Brad Parscale was confronted with the actual numbers by ABC News, he said, “These leaked numbers are ancient, in campaign terms, from months-old polling that began in March before two major events had occurred: the release of the summary of the Mueller report exonerating the President, and the beginning of the Democrat candidates defining themselves with their far-left policy message.” Trump himself called the numbers “phony polling information” and asserted that his polling was actually “the strongest I’ve ever been.”

And, now, the campaign has, according to the New York Times, fired three of its five pollsters to minimize the chance of damaging leaks in the future. That includes the Polling Company, previously run by Kellyanne Conway, Trump’s former campaign manager and current White House counselor. The campaign also fired Adam Geller, who worked for former New Jersey governor Chris Christie, and Michael Baselice, a pollster for former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, both of whom were on Trump’s 2016 campaign. Only pollsters Tony Fabrizio and John McLaughlin are staying on the 2020 campaign for now.

The fierce reaction isn’t entirely surprising given that Trump is notoriously obsessed with polling data on himself, and his staff has been known to hide polls from him if they show red flags for his approval rating. They also put together scrapbooks of flattering headlines and present it to him multiple times a day.

National polls also show Trump trailing leading Democratic contenders. But even if internal polling is more useful as a snapshot rather than a way to predict results (especially 18 months out from the general election), Trump’s internal polling might be more troubling to his team. The 2016 presidential election, when Trump claimed victory despite the majority of polls showing it was far out of his reach, may have shaken people’s faith in the accuracy of electoral polling, but Cambridge Analytica, working for the Trump campaign, actually managed to predict the final results just weeks before.

“We came to realize the way folks were polling in terms of their samples and who they consider likely voters, it’s probably been incorrect,” Matt Oczkowski, then-director of product for Cambridge Analytica, told Wired immediately after the election. He added, “This is not something that political intuition would tell you, but our models predicted most of these states correctly.” At this early stage, the pollsters he’s working with aren’t quite as positive on his chances.

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AOC warns of ‘very real risk’ of Trump win in 2020, says frustration with Pelosi is ‘quite real’

In her first Sunday morning show appearance since taking office in January, New York Democrat Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez warned that there is “very real risk” President Trump will win re-election in 2020, and acknowledged that progressive frustration with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is also “quite real.”

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In her first Sunday morning show appearance since taking office in January, New York Democrat Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez warned that there is “very real risk” President Trump will win re-election in 2020, and acknowledged that progressive frustration with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is also “quite real.”

The comments struck an unusually defensive tone for the 29-year-old progressive firebrand, as Democrats seek to winnow their large list of 23 presidential contenders. Ocasio-Cortez also spoke bluntly on her initiative to repeal the Hyde Amendment, which bars most federal funding for abortion — and 2020 Democrat frontrunner Joe Biden’s abrupt reversal on the issue earlier this month.

“I think that we have a very real risk of losing the presidency to Donald Trump if we do not have a presidential candidate that is fighting for true transformational change in the lives of working people in the United States,” Ocasio-Cortez told ABC News’ Jon Karl on “This Week” Sunday.

“I think that if we elect a president on half-measures that the American people don’t quite understand — the agenda of a president, you know, that says we’re fighting for higher wages but we don’t want a $15 minimum wage, fighting for education but we don’t want to make colleges tuition-free, fighting for women’s rights, et cetera, but we don’t want to go all the way with that, then I think we have a very real risk of losing the presidency,” Ocasio-Cortez continued.

Ocasio-Cortez said she did not see herself endorsing a particular candidate “any time soon,” however.

Responding to an NBC News poll showing growing support for an impeachment inquiry, Ocasio-Cortez called an impeachment investigation a “constitutional responsibility.” That prompted Karl to press Ocasio-Cortez on reports that progressive Democrats are frustrated with Pelosi, D-Calif., who has resisted calls for impeachment proceedings.

“I think it’s quite real,” Ocasio-Cortez. “I believe that there is a very real animus and desire to make sure that we are — that — that we are holding this president to account.”

A growing progressive anger has also targeted Biden, who said earlier this month he could “no longer support” the Hyde Amendment, which he had backed for decades. Biden said the law makes a woman’s right to an abortion “dependent on someone’s ZIP code.”

The Hyde Amendment prevents the government from providing abortion funding except in cases of rape, incest, or when the health of the mother is at stake.

Last week, an abortion activist questioning Biden on his Hyde Amendment flip-flop said the former vice president got in the activist’s face and attempted an arm grab. “I thought he was going to hit me,” the activist said, after posting a brief viral video and photo of the encounter.

The activist also noted the numerous accusations by other women that Biden has made them uncomfortable in close personal encounters.

“In every poll, a plurality of Americans opposes public funding of abortions.”

— Slate writer William Saletan

The Biden campaign did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment on the matter.  Ocasio-Cortez, asked whether Biden has handled the misconduct accusations appropriately, told Karl, “I think that’s something that he has to kind of show the electorate, I think that I, you know, I think that it is an issue where there is a struggle, I’ll be completely honest.”

She continued: “I don’t think that he has — I don’t — I wouldn’t say that it is an incredibly severe — like I don’t think that voters think that he is necessarily guilty of sexual misconduct or anything like that.”

Ocasio-Cortez also said Democrats “probably” made a mistake by not pushing back on Bill Clinton’s treatment of women during his presidency, but said the country has gone through an “evolution” in the years since.

But on the Hyde Amendment, Ocasio-Cortez has been more forceful.

“It’s not the 70s anymore,” Ocasio-Cortez said in an email to backers on Saturday, building support for a repeal of the Hyde Amendment. “This is 2019, and none of our leaders should be willing to stand by a policy that disproportionately harms low-income Americans and people of color just to suit the interests of anti-choice zealots. That ends now. We’re going to fight to repeal the Hyde Amendment, and let people access the care that they need. Sign your name if you stand for repealing the Hyde Amendment.”

On Sunday, Ocasio-Cortez said Biden’s new stance on the Hyde Amendment was the bare minimum for a Democrat candidate in 2020. As recently as the last presidential cycle, the Hyde Amendment enjoyed mostly bipartisan support.

“Well, I’m encouraged by the fact that he is now against the Hyde Amendment. I think that that’s where — I think it’s a very base level where all candidates need to be,” Ocasio-Cortez told Karl. “I’m excited to be introducing a repeal of the Hyde Amendment via amendment — we’ll see where it goes — for incarcerated women and the maternal and reproductive health care of incarcerated women is — it should be guaranteed as it is with all women in the United States. And so I think it really depends — and that’s really what the Hyde Amendment is about.”

Ocasio-Cortez continued: “The Hyde amendment isn’t about abortion per se. The Hyde amendment is — is truly about equality of health care and health care access for low-income women and women of color and women that get caught in our — in our mass incarceration system.

“We’re talking about 50, 51 percent of the American public being impacted by the realities of the Hyde Amendment,” she concluded.

But Democrats risk overplaying their hand on the issue, analysts warn, even as an increasing number of conservative-dominated states pass aggressive pro-life measures. A recent article in Slate by William Saletan, titled “Abortion Funding Isn’t As Popular As Democrats Think: Recent polls debunk much of what progressives believe,” contains a sobering analysis of the issue for the Democrat field.

“In every poll, a plurality of Americans opposes public funding of abortions,” Saletan wrote. “In every poll but one, that plurality is a majority.”

Saletan concluded that while most Americans generally agree with Democrats on the issue of abortion and don’t support defunding abortion clinics, the recent progressive push goes too far.

“On the question of direct payments [for abortion],” Saletan wrote, “most voters agree with the GOP. If Democrats make that question a litmus test, they’ll regret it.”

Nevertheless, last week Illinois enacted a sweeping pro-choice law that eliminated spousal consent, waiting periods, criminal penalties for abortion providers and restrictions on abortion facilities, such as licensing requirements and health and safety inspections. It also repealed the state’s Partial-birth Abortion Ban Act and established “that a fertilized egg, embryo, or fetus does not have independent rights under the law, of this State.”

The Thomas More Society, a pro-life law firm based in Chicago, declared the bill tantamount to “legalizing the death penalty, with no possibility of appeal, for viable unborn preemies.”

Karl did not ask Ocasio-Cortez about her role in torpedoing Amazon’s plan to locate a headquarters in New York, or a range of her policy proposals, prompting conservatives to dismiss the ABC sit-down as a softball interview.

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