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US States Rise Against the New Travel Ban Enforced by Trump

Along with Hawaii, three more states have contributed to a legal challenge against Trump’s controversial travel ban.

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US States Rise Against the New Travel Ban Enforced by Trump

Along with Hawaii, three more states have contributed to a legal challenge against Trump’s controversial travel ban.

On Monday, an executive order was placed to ban people for 90-days from six Muslim majority countries, exempting Iraq from the list. Additionally, a blanket ban has been placed on refugees coming to the United States. This ban will be taking into effect on March 16th.

New York capitalizes the travel ban as a direct attack on Muslims, while Washington states the ban is harmful to the state, as reported by BBC News. Massachusetts has also joined these two states.

Furthermore, Minnesota and Oregon are reportedly filing lawsuits against the travel ban.

Even among the opposition, the White House has said it is “very confident” the ban will win in court.

Protesters storm airports nationwide from Trump’s previous executive order

Hawaii took legal action against the ban, stating that the travel ban was harmful to the Muslim population, tourism and foreign students.

The revised ban bars new visas for people from; Somalia, Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya and Yemen. It also temporarily blocks all refugees.

Critics still claim the revised ban is an attack on Muslims.

“President Trump’s latest executive order is a Muslim Ban by another name, imposing policies and protocols that once again violate the Equal Protection Clause and Establishment Clause of the United State Constitution,” said New York Attorney General Eric T Schneiderman after announcing his legal challenge.

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, who was the first to sue over the original ban, said he would ask a federal judge to rule that the temporary restraining halting the first travel ban “remains in effect”.

“We’re asserting that the president cannot unilaterally declare himself free of the court’s restraining order and injunction,” he said, according to BBC News.

The lightly revised travel ban has excluded Iraq from the list due to the government boosting visa screening and data sharing, according to the White House.

However, the other six countries that were banned from the previous executive order, are once again added to the travel ban.

The new directive says refugees already approved by the State Department can enter the US. It also lifts an indefinite ban on all Syrian refugees.

Additionally, the ban does not hold preference over religious minorities, a critique from the previous travel ban which was judged by favoring Christian refugees.

Read the full executive order here.

 

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New Jersey Man Latest American Tourist to Die at Dominican Republic Resort

Joseph Allen is at least the ninth American to have died while staying at resorts in the the small Caribbean country.

An Avenel, New Jersey, man died last week while staying at a resort in the Dominican Republic, becoming at least the ninth other American tourist to die under mysterious circumstances while visiting the small Caribbean country…

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Joseph Allen is at least the ninth American to have died while staying at resorts in the the small Caribbean country.

An Avenel, New Jersey, man died last week while staying at a resort in the Dominican Republic, becoming at least the ninth other American tourist to die under mysterious circumstances while visiting the small Caribbean country.

Joseph Allen, 55, was found dead in his room Thursday at the Terra Linda Resort in Sosua, where he was celebrating a friend’s birthday, his family confirmed to NBC News. Allen’s sister-in-law said that the family was scrambling for answers.

New Jersey Man Latest American Tourist to Die at Dominican Republic Resort

Joseph Allen of Avenel, New Jersey, died last week while staying at a resort in the Dominica Republic, his family confirmed to NBC News Wednesday.

A number of other families reported stories of their relatives mysteriously dying while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic.

Leyla Cox, 53, an MRI technician from Staten Island, was staying at the Excellence resort in Punta Cana when she died on June 11, just a day after her birthday, according to her son. Will Cox said he still does not know his mother’s cause of death and has not had the chance to mourn properly as her remains still haven’t been returned home.

He also told NBC News that a representative for the U.S. Embassy said a toxicology test would not be conducted on his mother’s body due to broken machines.

Robert Bell Wallace, 67, died while staying at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Punta Cana on April 12. Wallace’s family asked for privacy and has not confirmed the circumstances of his death to NBC News.

In May, Miranda Schaup-Werner and a couple, Nathaniel Edward Holmes and Cynthia Ann Day, died over a five-day period at the Bahia Principe resort in La Romana.

Holmes and Day were found dead in their room at the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana. Pulmonary edema — excess fluid in the lungs — was listed among the causes of death for the couple in preliminary reports.

The FBI, which is investigating the three May deaths, said further toxicology results on the Americans could take up to 30 days.

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ICE to Remove ‘Millions of illegal Aliens’ in US, Trump says, Scant on Details

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ICE to Remove ‘Millions of illegal Aliens’ in US, Trump says, Scant on Details

President Donald Trump late Monday announced on Twitter that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement ICE will begin the process of “removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the U.S.,” but did not elaborate on what new measures will be taken.

“They will be removed as fast as they come,” Trump said.

Mike Morgan, the director of the agency, did not announce any new initiatives during his stop in Louisville on Sunday, where he spoke about the humanitarian and national security crisis at the border.

ICE did not immediately respond to an email from Fox News for comment.

Earlier this month, Trump announced that the U.S. reached a deal with Mexico that includes plans to return migrants seeking asylum to Mexico, where they will remain until they can be processed.

Trump praised Mexico in the tweet, saying the country has been doing a very good job at stopping those trying to gain access to the U.S. border.

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US to Send 1,000 Additional Troops to the Middle East as Tensions Escalate with Iran

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan announced Monday that President Donald Trump’s administration will send a thousand troops to the Middle East amid increased tensions with Iran…

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US to Send 1,000 Additional Troops to the Middle East as Tensions Escalate with Iran

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan announced Monday that President Donald Trump’s administration will send a thousand troops to the Middle East amid increased tensions with Iran.

Shanahan said that the increased forces were in response to a request from U.S. Central Command for defensive purposes to address air, naval and ground-based threats in the Middle East. U.S authorities accused Iran of attacks on two tankers last week, though the country’s foreign minister has denied the accusations.

“The recent Iranian attacks validate the reliable, credible intelligence we have received on hostile behavior by Iranian forces and their proxy groups that threaten United States personnel and interests across the region,” Shanahan said. “The U.S. does not seek conflict with Iran.”

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan, center, speaks about the situation in the Persian Gulf region during a meeting with Portuguese Minister of National Defense Joao Cravinho, at the Pentagon on June 14, 2019.

The decision comes hours after the State Department said Secretary of State Mike Pompeo planned to meet with U.S. military commanders overseeing American forces to provide more proof that Iran was behind the tanker attacks.

U.S. Central Command said the two vessels were hit Thursday by a limpet mine, which is attached to boats below the waterline using magnets.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif angrily dismissed the claims and said they were without “a shred of factual or circumstantial evidence.”

The Japanese owner of one of the tankers attacked in the Gulf of Oman contradicted reports by U.S. officials and the military on the source of the blast, claiming it was struck by a flying projectile.

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said in an interview with pan-Arabic newspaper Asharq al-Awsat last week that he would not hesitate to confront regional threats.

“The kingdom does not want war in the region, but we will not hesitate to deal with any threat to our people, our sovereignty and our vital interests,” Salman said.

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