Zika Virus Found In Bangladesh, South Korea

Zika Virus Found In Bangladesh, South Korea

Concern over the Zika virus has only increased after Bangladesh and South Korea confirmed their first cases.


Bangladesh Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research said that the Zika virus had been found in a 67-year old man who had never traveled outside of the country.

“The virus was found in the man as we tested old blood samples of nearly 1,000 people afflicted with fever in 2014 and 2015,” said the institute’s director.

The South Korean Center for Disease Control confirmed they had found the virus in a 43-year old man who had visited Brazil.

Large parts of South America have been hit the hardest by the Zika virus, with Brazil being effected the most. The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention issued a travel warning when it was discovered the virus had spread to Cuba. Cuban health officials confirmed infections in 5 people and reported more than 100 others are exhibiting symptoms.

Pregnant women in particular are urged to avoid countries impacted by the virus. The CDC has stated that as many as 80 percent of those infected will never exhibit any symptoms, but it has been connected to a number of birth defects and neurological disorders in newborns. It is strongly suspected, though not confirmed, to be a cause of microcephaly, a condition which causes babies to be born with undersized heads.

The CDC and the World Health Organization have predicted the virus will continue to spread. Travelers can protect themselves while in afflicted countries by using condoms during sexual intercourse, as the Zika virus can be transmitted through sex, using mosquito repellent, and either closing all windows or using a mosquito net while sleeping.

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