Connect with us

Viral

‘Crazy’ Raccoon Dog Terrorizes Villagers in the UK

A wild raccoon dog has been terrorizing a U.K. village, terrifying locals and attacking pets.

SWNS reports that police were called to Clarborough in Nottinghamshire this week after some residents were subjected to a two-hour standoff with the strange-looking animal.

Published

on

'Crazy' Raccoon Dog Terrorizes Villagers in the UK

A wild raccoon dog has been terrorizing a U.K. village, terrifying locals and attacking pets.

SWNS reports that police were called to Clarborough in Nottinghamshire this week after some residents were subjected to a two-hour standoff with the strange-looking animal.

Villager Mandy Marsh was woken by a “blood-curdling scream” early on Tuesday morning and her husband Dale ran outside to see a raccoon dog confronting the couple’s pet goat and pony. “He came back and he said to me ‘you are going to have to come and see this, there is something in the field attacking the pony and I have absolutely no idea what it is’,” she told SWNS.

“This raccoon was absolutely crazy. It was hissing and screaming and snarling,” Marsh added. “It was going absolutely mad.”

Armed with planks of wood, it took the couple two hours to chase the angry raccoon dog away, although their pet goat was left with a sore shoulder and scratches following the animal’s attack.

The raccoon dog returned moments later to confront a dog walker outside the March’s home, according to SWNS.

Police have warned local residents to be vigilant.

'Crazy' Raccoon Dog Terrorizes Villagers in the UK

Two raccoon dogs went missing from a nearby enclosure on the morning of May 28, according to Nottinghamshire Police. “The animals, which are described as being the same size of a medium-to-small-sized dog, are potentially dangerous if approached as they are not domesticated,” it added, in a statement.

Marsh said that a local wildlife tracker offered to help track the raccoon dogs and had told her that something had been attacking local animals recently.

'Crazy' Raccoon Dog Terrorizes Villagers in the UK

Raccoon dogs are not raccoons, but are members of the canid, or dog family, according to the U.K.’s Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA). They are related to foxes and wolves.

“Raccoon dogs are wild animals – rather than domesticated pets,” it explains, on its website, noting that the animals pose “a highly invasive risk” to native species in Europe.

Entrepreneur, contributor, writer, and editor of Sostre News. With a powerful new bi-lingual speaking generation by his side, Sostre News is becoming the preferred site for the latest in Politics, Entertainment, Sports, Culture, Tech, Breaking and World News.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

Padma Lakshmi’s Viral Fourth of July Pie Featured a Political Message

Published

on

Padma Lakshmi's Viral Fourth of July Pie Featured a Political Message

Padma Lakshmi used pie to make a political statement during her Fourth of July celebrations this year.

Lakshmi made a berry pie with the phrase “close the camps” written with dough on the top for Thursday’s holiday. The “Top Chef” host and author seemed to be referring to the controversial immigration detention facilities at the US border, which many have compared to concentration camps.

The host, who describes herself as an “immigrant” in her Twitter bio, shared a photo of her dessert with followers on social media, calling it a “truly American pie.”

In a subsequent tweet, Lakshmi urged her followers to contact their local representatives and “demand they #CloseTheCamps.” She also shared an image of herself holding the pie.

Lakshmi’s political dessert got a lot of users talking on Twitter.

Some were even inspired to create their own politically-inspired treats for the Fourth of July.

Other users were less enthusiastic, and some even “fixed” Lakshmi’s pie to better align with their own political views to say “close the borders.”

Lakshmi’s baking project also gained the support of celebrities like Busy Philipps and Amy Schumer, who shared their support on social media.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Thanks for posting this @padmalakshmi @laurabenanti #closethecamps

A post shared by @ amyschumer on

The “Top Chef” host and author is the latest celebrity to speak out in support of immigrant rights. Stars like Mindy Kaling, Chrissy Teigen, and John Legend have donated their time or money to pro-immigration organizations while condemning anti-immigrant sentiments.

Continue Reading

Viral

Creator of Viral Twitter Heroin Hoax Shane Morris Starts GoFundMe to Hide From MS-13

Nashville web developer Shane Morris sat down at his computer Monday night, opened Twitter, and tried to go viral.

“Y’all wanna hear a story about the…

Published

on

reator of Viral Twitter Heroin Hoax Shane Morris Starts GoFundMe to Hide From MS-13

Nashville web developer Shane Morris sat down at his computer Monday night, opened Twitter, and tried to go viral.

“Y’all wanna hear a story about the time I accidentally transported a brick of heroin from Los Angeles to Seattle?” Morris tweeted. “I bet. Alright, let’s do this…”

The story, according to Morris, went as follows: A few years back, he discovered a package of heroin in a van he had purchased. Instead of turning the drugs in, he quickly sold them—making him an admitted to drug trafficker. For a year or so, nothing important happened. But then, the son of the van’s previous owner tried to buy back the van, ostensibly in an attempt to reclaim the heroin. According to Morris, he fooled the son into thinking that the heroin was still there by packaging a copy of John Grisham’s The Pelican Brief and putting it where the drugs had been.

If this wasn’t crazy enough, Morris—still on Twitter—then taunted Salvadoran gang MS-13, claiming that he had tricked one of the gang’s members out of the money with a John Grisham book.

Morris’ tweets were a hit, garnering more than 67,000 retweets and getting aggregated across the Internet. The heroin escapades offered the rare chance Twitter users to share in an experience that wasn’t about a disaster or politics, with one declaring it “the greatest fucking story I’ve ever read.”

“THIS IS ABSOLUTELY WILD,” tweeted New York Times reporter Sopan Deb.

A few days later, though, Morris is reconsidering whether his viral fame was such a good idea. Having taunted a deadly gang, he is now saying the thread was not true.

“I realized, because of my lie, that it’s not fun to fuck with MS-13,” Morris told The Daily Beast.

Morris said that his Twitter thread, which he stresses was a fabrication, has prompted real threats against his life. And so he’s embarked on a separate internet campaign to clean up the mess he created. In a Medium post on Friday, Morris insisted the story was fake.

“Most importantly, I definitely didn’t rob an MS-13 gang member,” Morris wrote. “In retrospect, that’s probably the dumbest thing you can write and put on the internet.”

Morris isn’t the first person to fabricate a Twitter story for internet clout and almost assuredly won’t be the last. In 2013, a Bachelor producer went viral for tweets about passive aggressive notes passed on an airplane, but later admitted it was all fake.

But Morris may be the first to face death threats over his Twitter story, presuming that those threats are actually true themselves. Morris is supposedly in such risk, he said, that he made a GoFundMe page to pay for his disappearance along with his wife. The fundraising pitch is pretty straightforward: “I Need To Go Into Hiding.”

Continue Reading

Viral

45 Years Later, Girl’s Message in Bottle Found

Published

on

SALISBURY, Md. — Nearly five decades ago, a young girl threw a bottle into the Indian River Bay, hoping to get a response from a stranger in a faraway land.

Inside the bottle was a scrawled letter from Karen Ball, who was on an annual family camping trip to the inlet. She dated her message Sept. 6, 1971, and asked her prospective recipients to contact her.

Her message went unanswered.

Ball soon forgot about her act of whimsy, went on to graduate college and began a career as a registered nurse. She never thought she would receive a reply 45 years later.

“I just … I just couldn’t believe it,” she said. “I honestly thought it was a prank call or something.”

A view of the dune near Savage Ditch where the Berenty's found the message in a bottle with the Indian River Inlet Bridge in the background where the bottle was dropped in the background on Tuesday, May 31.

A view of the dune near Savage Ditch where the Berenty’s found the message in a bottle with the Indian River Inlet Bridge in the background where the bottle was dropped in the background on Tuesday, May 31.

Her weathered, green soda bottle was unearthed by Andy Berenty and his family on April 22.

Berenty and his family had been fishing at Delaware Seashore State Park, enjoying a vacation, when they noticed something sparkling in the sand.

“It was really strange,” said Berenty, whose central New Jersey family loves surf fishing at the inlet several times a year. “All of a sudden, this huge windstorm ripped through and cleared some sand off the dunes. And there it was … just poking out from the top. It was like the bottle was calling us over or something.”

The message inside the bottle — torn from a simple, spiral-bound notebook — survived fairly well, besides some discoloration and frayed edges.

“When we unrolled it, I knew we had found something special,” he said.

Overall, their trip had been profitable, both for catching fish and for finding beach treasure. In addition to Ball’s message, the family uncovered a handful of glass bottles and a few beer cans dating back to the 1930s, in addition to loading their family truck up with several bags of garbage.

“It’s tradition,” he said. “We do a beach cleanup with every visit. And we’ve found a lot of cool stuff over the years. But Karen’s bottle is probably the coolest. I just couldn’t wait to get home and call her.

“I kept thinking, ‘I have to find this woman, and tell her I finally found it.’ ”

Ball was still living in Stroudsburg, Pa., at the address written on the note. She had recently moved back home to care for her parents, and was shocked to hear someone had found her message.

“I remember when I threw it in, I thought, ‘Someone in China or Japan is gonna find it,’ ” she said, recalling the day she watched the bottle float away. “But I never heard anything. I thought about it from time to time, but I thought it was gone forever. I am just so tickled someone actually found it, after all this time. Life is really something.”

The bottle’s discovery amazed both families, considering the inlet’s drastic changes over the decades, including new bridges and numerous storms that have pelted and altered its landscape.

“The area has always been extremely dynamic,” said Laura Scharle, interpretive programs manager at Delaware Seashore State Park. “Our records show that the inlet itself has moved several times since the early 1800s due to natural forces, such as hurricanes and nor’easters.”

The Berenty's pose for a photo near the dune where they found a message in a bottle with the Indian River Inlet Bridge in the background where the bottle was dropped in the background on Tuesday, May 31.

The Berenty’s pose for a photo near the dune where they found a message in a bottle with the Indian River Inlet Bridge in the background where the bottle was dropped in the background on Tuesday, May 31.

Man-made jetties installed in 1939 stabilized it, she said.

Old fishing piers and bridges have reshaped the scenery since Ball threw her bottle into the water, leading up to today’s current bridge, completed in 2012, which now carries four lanes of highway, connecting Rehoboth Beach and Bethany Beach.

Ball still vacations in the area, taking time to reminisce how the inlet “used to be.”

“It’s so different,” she said, looking around with misty eyes. “But it still smells the same. The salty air was the same the day I dropped that bottle.”

No one can know exactly where it traveled for almost a half-century. Maybe it made its way to the Gulf, or circled the Atlantic, like Ball hopes. Maybe it beached after a week or a year.

“I guess we’ll never know,” she said, smiling.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending