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YouGov: Young White British Men are Most Derided Group in UK, Survey Says

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Young white British men are the most derided group in Britain, according to a survey that highlights drinking and drug-taking as their most negative traits.

Young white British men are the most derided group in Britain, according to a survey that highlights drinking and  drug-taking as their most negative traits.

The YouGov poll found that people expect white British men in their twenties to be the laziest, rudest and the most promiscuous group in the country. It also found that people believe they are the most likely to get drunk and, along with black Caribbean men in their twenties, to take drugs.

Researchers explored people’s attitudes to 48 different groups of men and women in three different age groups and asked pollsters to score them on a set of positive and negative criteria.

White British men were the worst ethnic, gender or age group on five negative traits and the second worst on five positive traits. Their worst trait was seen to be their perceived desire to “get drunk frequently”.

YouGov’s Peter Kellner said: “The people we regard as the laziest, rudest, most promiscuous, drunken drug-takers are white men in their twenties.”  The survey, carried out by YouGov for Prospect, used data from 48 separate surveys. It found that white women in their sixties were the most popular demographic, followed by white men in their sixties.

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Figures show the net percentage who say each group has the following positive qualities or is likely to do the following negative activities. In all, there were 48 surveys on different ethnic, age and gender groups

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Mr Kellner added: “The lousy reputation of young white [British] men is one of the most striking things to emerge from our surveys.” Polish men in their twenties scored higher than white British men in their twenties for working hard, politeness and helping others, and were found to be as intelligent and honest as young British white men in the poll, which comes as David Cameron is proposing a four-year ban on EU migrants from claiming in-work benefits.

“Poles clearly do better,” Mr Kellner said. “We think they are more likely to be polite and to help others – and far more likely to work hard. As with all our findings, we should stress that these are perceptions.”

The poll found that Ukip voters tend to be “far more critical” of Polish, Pakistani, Muslim and black Caribbean people than Jewish, Chinese, white or Australian people on every characteristic including intelligence. People who voted Ukip in the last general election believed there was a much bigger gap in perceived intelligence between different ethnic groups, and believed Chinese people were the most intelligent and Muslims the least, according to the survey.

Labour, Conservative and Liberal Democrat voters all recorded lower gaps between perceptions of the intelligence of the highest and lowest-rated ethnic groups.

Mr Kellner said it is “clear” that people’s judgements and prejudices are “seldom racist in the traditional sense”, and that gender matters more in people’s perceptions than age or ethnicity.

Five of the six most derided groups were men, with the exception of white women in their twenties, who formed the third most derided group. Five of the six most popular groups were women.

Most people appear to regard most groups positively rather than negatively on most attributes, he said, but the extent to which they do that “varies hugely” and those variations are “not just big, but complex”. He added: “We can debate whether what needs to change are the different cultural norms of different groups, or public perceptions, or both. However, we should not be too pessimistic. Had similar research been conducted 50 years ago, the gulf between the most and least admired groups might well have been far wider.

“But it is still too wide for comfort. Perhaps the starting point for narrowing it further is an honest debate about the extent to which we need to change perceptions, and the extent to which we need to change reality.”

Entrepreneur, contributor, writer, and editor of Sostre News. With a powerful new bi-lingual speaking generation by his side, Sostre News is becoming the preferred site for the latest in Politics, Entertainment, Sports, Culture, Tech, Breaking and World News.

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Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are Paying $1200 a Month for a Bunk Bed in a Shared Space

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Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are Paying $1200 a Month for a Bunk Bed in a Shared Space

Would you pay $1200 a month for a bunk bed in a shared space? Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are opting for pods in communal home with a desk, locker and personal TV

With the cost of rent continuing to rise, some Americans are taking unusual measures to find a place to sleep.

In Los Angeles and San Francisco, where prices are particularly exorbitant, people have taken to renting bunk beds in communal homes.

PodShare, which provides 10 to 15 co-ed bunkbeds in six locations across California, is hoping to help solve the affordable housing crisis.

The beds can be rented from $35 to $50 a night, which amounts to between $1,050 and $1500 for one month.

Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are Paying $1200 a Month for a Bunk Bed in a Shared Space

The beds can be rented from $35 to $50 a night, which amounts to between $1,050 and $1500 for one month. Pictured: Bunkbeds at a PodShare location

 

Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are Paying $1200 a Month for a Bunk Bed in a Shared Space

Every ‘pod’ comes with a bed that turns into a desk, individual power outlets, a locker, a shelf and a personal TV. Pictured: A resident at one of the PodShare locations

It’s no secret that housing prices have rapidly spiked over the last decade and incomes have not kept up

One 2018 study published found that only about one-third of millennials currently own homes.

This is fewer than the number of Generation Xers and baby boomers who owned homes when they were the same age.

And a study conducted by Harvard University this year found that one-in-three Americans can’t afford to pay rent.

It’s unsurprising considering that, in cities such as San Francisco, the average rent for an apartment is about $3,900.

But for $1,200, if you rent with PodShare everyone gets a bed that turns into a desk, individual power outlets, a locker, a shelf and a personal TV.

Each location also provides a communal living room, food such as cereal, toiletries such as toilet paper, laundry machines and WiFi access, reported CNN.

Tenants are known as ‘pod-estrians’.

Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are Paying $1200 a Month for a Bunk Bed in a Shared Space

Additionally, each location has a communal living room, a kitchen (pictured), laundry machines and WiFi access. Pictured: One of the kitchens

 

Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are Paying $1200 a Month for a Bunk Bed in a Shared Space

The company was founded in 2012 by 34-year-old Elvina Beck. Pictured: One of the communal workspaces

Although the set-up may seem like an adult dormitory or a hostel, the company uses the term ‘co-living’.

‘PodShare makes life more affordable because there is no security deposit or cost of furnishings and we provide flexible living,’ co-founder Elvina Beck told Vice in 2016.

‘Pod life is the future for singles which are not looking to settle down, but focus on their startups and experience something new.’

There are no curtains to close off the beds, and the only doors are to the bathroom, reported Time Out Los Angeles.

Although there’s no privacy, pod-residents are willing to exchange that for affordability or a reduced travel time to work.

Beck, 34, told CNN that she founded the company in 2012 because she wanted to meet new people and provide housing security to others.

‘Maybe they don’t have two months’ rent to put down or they don’t have proof of income,’ she said.

‘Whether it’s from a divorce or their family kicked them out for being gay or because they’re in a different country or a different city.’

Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are Paying $1200 a Month for a Bunk Bed in a Shared Space

Beck says that most of the early residents were between ages 24 and 30, and that now they are in their late 20s or early 30s. Pictured: Lockers at one PodShare location

 

Renters in Los Angeles and San Francisco are Paying $1200 a Month for a Bunk Bed in a Shared Space

Hard rules that each tenant must follow include: lights have to be off by 10pm, no guests are allowed and tenants can’t have sex. Pictured: Bunkbeds at one PodShare location

She told CNN that, when she began PodShare, most residents were between ages 24 and 30. Today, however, most ‘tenants’ are in their late 20s or early 30s.

Additionally, many of the early residents were young adults who had just moved to a new city. But many new residents are older adults and even those traveling on business.

However, there some rules that people are required to follow. Lights have to be off by 10pm, no guests are allowed and tenants can’t have sex.

‘You can’t invite any friends over,’ Beck told CNN. ‘Sorry. Just make new ones here.’

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Caretaker Ties a Wheelchair-Bound Pensioner to a Tree by The Neck

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Caretaker Ties a Wheelchair-Bound Pensioner to a Tree by The Neck

Shocking footage of a wheelchair-bound pensioner being tied to a tree by the neck by a caretaker has sparked controversy in China.

The caretaker claimed to have no other way but to bind her frail client with a rope because she had to rush back home to deal with family emergency.

Furious onlookers demanded the caretaker free the pensioner immediately. The domestic worker defended her act by calling the incident ‘no big deal’.

The video was reportedly shot in Beijing recently, according to local news outlet Btime.com.

Related: Killer Snatched Girl, 11, Suffocated Her Then Dumped Corpse in Sewer

The pensioner appeared extremely distressed throughout the video and could not speak clearly.

One angry male passer-by accused the caretaker: ‘How would you feel if your daughter treated you like this?’

He criticised the caretaker and said she should bring the pensioner with her.

The caretaker replied: ‘[If I had] pushed her back, she would tell [on me].’

Another female bystander pointed out that the pensioner neck had turned red because of the rough treatment.

After being lambasted by eyewitnesses, the caretaker untied the pensioner and pushed her away.

Authority said the clip had been uploaded onto the social media by residents in a neighbourhood called Nanyuan on the outskirts of southern Beijing.

But they had not been able to identify the exact location of the incident or track down the individuals involved.

Police have been alerted of the video and launched an investigation, according to Beijing Evening News.

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Comforting Shelter Dogs During Fireworks Is The New Independence Day Tradition

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Comforting Shelter Dogs During Fireworks Is The New Independence Day Tradition

“Calming the Canines,” at Maricopa County Animal Care and Control (MCACC), is a new Independence Day tradition.

Comforting Shelter Dogs During Fireworks Is The New Independence Day Tradition

Last year, over 300 people from the community showed up at the shelter’s two locations around Phoenix, Arizona.

It was overwhelming to see how the community responded. It really helped spread our message that MCACC is here to help.

Comforting Shelter Dogs During Fireworks Is The New Independence Day Tradition

Amy Engel, who attended Calming the Canines last year said that she definitely plans on attending this year, too.

Engel wrote about her experience last year

Some people sang to them, some people read to them, some people just sat there and gave treats! It was so, so awesome because the dogs absolutely love the attention and were focused on the people and not the fireworks going on outside.

Comforting Shelter Dogs During Fireworks Is The New Independence Day Tradition

MCACC wrote:

Many participants developed lasting relationships with the shelter, returning to provide foster care, adopt a pet or volunteer.

The shelter suggests people to bring blankets to sit on, or folding chairs, and to let the dog or cat approach them to sit calmly and quietly.

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